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3 Ways to Build Genuine Employee Morale & Loyalty

January 23, 2017 |

3 Ways to Build Genuine Employee Morale & Loyalty

Businesses that people believe in and are connected to tend to attract and keep better talent. We have heard time and time again that people who love the environment they work in do their job well and more effectively. Let alone the employee turnover percentage decreases, and employee morale is boosted. We see success stories from corporate companies like Google, but how does a company take practical steps in gaining this advantage?

1. Understand that leadership is your foundation.

As a leader, it is important that you are showcasing your brand, culture, and business identity well. Talk is cheap, if you aren’t walking the walk your employees will notice and often lose respect for their leaders quickly.

Part of a leader’s job is to pave the way towards certainty, and doing so means offering constant guidance and direction to the workforce. In fact, 64% of employees say there is often confusion about who’s doing what on the job.

As a business owner and a leader, your employees want to know that you can communicate effectively, engage and work directly with them, and ultimately, are pleasant to work with. Developing an effective leadership style for your company is what will lead to creating a stable foundation.

2. Know what your employees value.

The focus of leadership needs to be shifted from process and outcome, to people and the future. To retain both a positive work environment and company culture, it’ll be crucial to emphasize that what matters to your employees, matters to the company. Whether that’s offering great health benefits or paid time off, you really need learn what valuable incentives they need the most.

By supporting what they value, they will in turn value your company.

3. Be intentional with your culture.

Engaged employees are the difference between those who just show up and the high performers who define the company’s success. If you want to nip disengagement in the bud before it proliferates, focus more on the one element that makes your organization unique: people.

Culture in a business takes time, effort, and energy to implement. Focus on the team dynamic and how each individual works together. It takes intentionality to define what your standards are.

In defining your own company culture, ask yourself:

  • How does my team interact?
  • How does my team communicate?
  • What behavior modifications need to change, and how are you going to change them?

Keep in mind that culture does not happen overnight. It takes accountability, and people who desire to coach others through the process. The benefits to creating and being intentional about building a positive culture in your workplace far outweighs the consequence of accidentally creating a bad one.

Intentionality is key, and with this comes to opportunity to grow as a company and maintain and multiply loyal employees.